How Has the Coronavirus Pandemic Affected the Horse Racing Industry? PART TWO!

PART TWO CORRECT

Hiya guys!

Welcome to Part Two of my new project. If you haven’t already pop over to this link to view Part One before reading Part Two!

https://zoelouisesmithx.com/2020/06/30/how-has-the-coronavirus-pandemic-affected-the-horse-racing-industry-part-one

I am going to jump straight into this part for you guys. I hope you enjoy!

As mentioned in part one, jockeys have been massively affected by the pandemic, I spoke with Grace Mcentee who told me how the cancellation of racing has affected her.

“When it was announced that racing was going to be put to a stop due to coronavirus and we were going into lockdown it really couldn’t have come at a worse time for me as I was battling it out for the Champion All Weather Apprentice title (I finished second) and I was getting plenty of outside rides/opportunities and was getting a nice amount of winners, so I was finally at the point that I had been working towards and who knows if racing had carried on, what I could have achieved. I was gutted about it but just pleased that my friends and family were all safe and healthy.”

She went on to tell me how lockdown has affected her…

“During lockdown it was hard to keep my weight down and fitness levels up with no target to when racing was going to resume but that was the struggle for most jockeys, so I just did what I could and made the most of the time off to try and improve anything that I wanted to.”

So how has Grace coped with the return of racing after so long away from the track?

“I’ve been back riding now just over 2 weeks and I’m pleased to say that I got a winner first week back of racing resuming for 5lb apprentices, so I was delighted but I just need to build contacts back up now to get back to where I was going before racing stopped and hopefully have a nice season ahead of me.”

If you have followed me for a little while you will know I got the opportunity to visit Grace and her dad Phil just before coronavirus really gripped the UK and whilst Grace was going into the final race of the All Weather Apprentice championship and they made me feel so welcome and I loved my time with them. I think Grace is a fantastic jockey and I wish more trainers would reach out and give her a chance to ride for them, hopefully in time, now racing is back up and running, that will come! Grace’s dad Phil has kindly donated a stable visit followed by 2 tickets to a local meeting to my raffle. If you want to enter my raffle all information and links will be at the bottom of this page.

Many of you may, or should know Charlie Poste, an ex jockey who know produces and breaks in horses as well as point to point. I spoke with him about how it has affected his business.

“Our business has been affected by the early shutdown of the point to point season. Therefore any owner, rider or horse we had in training were immediately taken out of training. It also meant we have been denied a lot of racing opportunities to run our unraced horses, hopefully they would have won or ran well enough to sell at the spring sales – which were also abandoned. As this is a major profit element of our business, it’s obviously been far from ideal.”

Charlie went on to tell me how he hopes to move forward.

“Moving forward, you would imagine once point to pointing resumed, the prices for winning horses will take a hit and we have to factor in that the young horses tend to make most profit when they win in the spring of their 4 year old year. So having that opportunity taken away, I would imagine, will undoubtedly have an affect on their potential profit if they win or run well in the Autumn. The other factor from this means that we haven’t turned over anywhere near as many of the existing stock as would normally be the case. So it will impact on how many horses we are able to purchase at the upcoming store horse sales, partly due to stabling space and of course, cash flow from having more horses than normal still on the books.”

Charlie also breaks in horses, so how has this been affected? Charlie went on to explain to me!

“The other side of our business which provides the bulk of the work we do through the summer months is breaking in store horses for the professional yards, alongside our own young horses. As there have been no store horse sales it’s meant numbers of horses in the yard have been greatly reduced. We would normally expect to have around 30-40 horses to break in, fairly constantly from May until August when our pointers come back into work. This year we have had probably between 10-20 over the same period.”

Charlie went on to explain to me a little bit about what we may see in the future.

“We are due to have a young horse sale next month and it will be very interesting to see what the prices are like and if they have been affected by the current situation, and if so, by how much. We will also see how many people are keen to buy and then if they buy, how many are still keen to send them to us to break in. The pointing season is due to start earlier this Autumn and this could prove to be a real blessing as it will at least offer us the chance to run our young horses and all being well, sell them at the sales at Cheltenham in November, which is normally off limits to us as British pointing hasn’t started until mid November in previous years.”

Charlie then summed up the situation as a whole.

“Others within racing have undoubtedly been worse hit than us, but we have definitely seen changes to our business over the last few months and like many others, hope things soon return to something like normality.”

I was lucky enough to interview Charlie just before Cheltenham and just before Coronavirus really took hold of the UK. I can honestly say he is one of the most knowledgable people I have ever met within racing. He knows so much about so many aspects of racing, so I was so glad I could get his viewpoint for this project. I know for a fact if I owned a race horse I would send it straight to Charlie, he knows what he’s doing and I would highly recommend any trainer or owner sending their horses his way. Charlie has also donated a prize to my raffle for the Stroke Association… 4 tickets to a meeting at Warwick races with a course walk with Charlie before racing begins. All information on how to enter will be at the end of this post!

As I mentioned in part 1, on course bookmakers have been affected majorly by the pandemic and are amongst the few who still cannot return to work. I spoke with Ben / Benthebookie on Twitter about how Coronavirus has had a massive affect with on course bookmakers.

“As a bookmaker it has been a total disaster to be honest. Our total revenue stream has been removed, but unlike the rest of the industry we still aren’t back to work.”

He went on to tell me a little more about how this could really really be bad for bookmakers…

“I’m in a fortunate position, we are a limited company so I’m furloughed but have still taken a big cut. A lot are sole traders and they are frankly in trouble and may not be able to come back from this. Racing will miss us if we go.”

In my opinion, I totally agree with Ben on that point. It will be devastating to the industry if a lot of on course bookmakers can’t afford to return to the track once the public do. I hope that the BHA can reach out to those worse affected and ensure that they will again return to the race course.

Another sector affected by the pandemic is of course owners, syndicates etc. I spoke with Megan O’Brien who is the racing manager for Titanium Racing who told me how she has coped with this pandemic as well as how she has managed to continue to run the syndicate.

“As a racing manager it was a worrying time as lockdown happened. Not only on how do you keep your members happy and included with no racing but also the horses. We stuck with it and kept all our horses in training in support of the yards. The trainers and staff really did an excellent job of keeping the horses on the go for as long as they did with effectively no initial end game.”

So how did Megan manage to include all of their members whilst racing was cancelled and now very limited? She explained it all to me.

“I do regular updated anyway, so little has changed in that regard. We provide members with free access to The Racing Manager which is an excellent tool whereby trainers can send updates such as videos and photos directly. Seeing the horses work was a great boost. Upon racing returning, it was always going to be tricky with the racing so competitive and difficult to get in. But I’ve held regular Zoom meetings so members can watch the racing together.”

Megan then told me a more positive note and what the future holds.

“It’s unprecedented times and no one could guarantee what would happen, I was pleasantly surprised at how much interest there was during the down time and we even gained a few new members. We’re looking forward to the day we are able to get back to the stables to see the horses and also get back on the race course.”

I have firsthand spoken with Megan a few times and I know how hard she works with the Titanium Racing team, so I am so happy to hear things have gone well for them throughout this tough period. If you’re looking to join a group, I highly recommend Titanium and Megan.

And with that, it is the end of part two. I want to thank Grace, Charlie, Ben and Megan for their time. I hope you enjoyed part two of this project. 

Part three will be coming Saturday morning at 11am. Part three includes Johnson White (Philip Hobbs’ assistant), Debbie from Go Racing Green & more! You can now also subscribe to my blog so you receive an email whenever I post, if you’d like to do that scroll down on the side bar and you will see a Follow My Blog section. If you enter your email every time I post you will receive an email so you don’t miss a thing!

Thank you for reading, I will see you all on Saturday with Part three of this project.

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Sidenote: My raffle to raise money for the Stroke Association is now LIVE. So you can pop over to my Twitter and view this tweet for all information: https://twitter.com/zoelouisesmithx/status/1277629857460113410?s=20 There are some fantastic prizes and it is for a fantastic cause in honour of the 10 year anniversary of my mom’s stroke. The Stroke Association help not only those directly affected by a stroke, but also their families. They helped my mom massively and I wanted to raise money for them so they can continue to help other people in need. I hope you can all join me in raising money for this incredible cause!

How Has the Coronavirus Pandemic Affected the Horse Racing Industry? PART ONE!

PART ONE CORRECT

Hiya guys!

Welcome to my new project/series! Today is part one, there will be more parts to follow over the next few days so keep your eyes peeled!

This project is something different to the usual interviews I post and it is something I have been working on for a few weeks now, so I hope you guys enjoy!

Each post in this project will still include little snippets of interviews I have done with people within the sport, but in general this post will be all about just how Coronavirus has affected the horse racing industry from all angles. From jockeys and trainers, to bookmakers and racecourses, to the media and presenters, to sponsors and race managers, to businesses and bloggers. I feel as though I have tried to do a good job in looking at all aspects of the sport and getting opinions from them all.

As a whole, the sport has been massively affected by the virus and the lockdown and I thought it would be interesting to really look into different areas of the sport. By speaking to people throughout the industry I have managed to find out a lot about just how severely the sport has been impacted.

Of course, horse racing and sport in general is not the be all and end all of life, and whilst we have missed seeing sport on our TV’s we know that the lockdown and cancelling sport was the right thing to do. But I wanted to look away from the virus as a whole and focusing on horse racing for this post and I think you will all find it an interesting read as I have whilst doing my research. I know personally that not having any racing has severely impacted me as a ‘blogger’ because there are no stable visits, no meetings, no face to face interviews, basically not much I could do. I was very lucky in the respect that I could reach out online to people within the industry and arrange interviews to be held digitally so I could still create content, just not as involved as I could have been if racing was still going ahead. So I thought I would reach out to a whole range of people and see just how lockdown and the cancellation of racing has affected them!

I want to quickly thank all of the people who took part in this project who you will see throughout. With all of that out of the way, let’s jump right in. I hope you all enjoy!

Some of the main people affected by the cancellation of all racing is of course the jockey’s, who essentially lost their day jobs for an extended period of time. So how difficult have jockey’s found their time off? I spoke with Oisin Murphy who told me the following:

“I suppose the Coronavirus pandemic halted my riding from around the 17th of March and I had never not ridden for more than about 4 weeks before – I had broken a collar bone and the maximum amount of time I was off was I think 26 days, so obviously I found it very difficult to deal with that. I’m not a person that goes on holiday or anything so to be stuck with no focus was incredibly difficult.”

He then went on to tell me how he changed his mindset and how he dealt with those feelings of being a little bit lost.

“After a period of time I realised that everyone was in it together and what about the large families in towns and cities? They’re the people really suffering. So that changed my mindset a fair bit.”

So what does a jockey do when they can’t race? Oisin explained how he’s been using his time off.

“I went walking and running every day… I also did a little bit of cooking and just had a focus point each day. But thank goodness we got the green light from the 1st of June.”

So how different is horse racing now it’s back up and running? Oisin Murphy filled me in with just some of the rules the jockey’s have to adhere to.

“There are so many things we must adhere to. We have a daily email that we must fill out with a questionnaire of 12 questions. Temperature checks on arrival then you get given a wristband. Everybody is social distancing in the weighing room, then in the paddock we obviously have to wear face masks. You get to the start and in the stalls we’re allowed to pull the face masks down. Obviously in higher temperatures it’s hard to breath which is far from ideal – but that’s what we’ve been asked to do. Then we pull them up before we get back in the shoot on your horse. Weighing in has changed – nothing is the same. There are no showers and after 9 or 10 rides, most cards are 10 races, I’ve got to travel all the way home stinking – which isn’t ideal either. So that’s an idea of what we’re doing at the moment.”

Oisin is obviously a class act and his social media presence is very needed in our sport with videos and content to really involve people. Oisin has always been there to help me out with everything, if I have ever needed help or advice I have sent him a text and he’s always got back to me. To me I think it’s brilliant that he is so willing to help young people come through racing and create content. We 100% need more people like Oisin in the racing world. Oisin has also donated a signed pair of breaches for my raffle for the Stroke Association, I will have links at the bottom of this post if you’re interesting in entering to win!

Another sector massively affected by the pandemic is of course the TV side of things, with no racing to show, of course TV presenters struggled to work. I spoke with Rishi Persad, who some of you may recognise as a TV presenter who of course had nothing to present during the lockdown. He told me how he coped with the situation:

“It was all surreal to begin with, not just because of lockdown but I also broke my leg in early March and had already had to come to terms with missing lots of events that I would normally have attended – Cheltenham, Dubai World Cup, Grand National etc. However, once I accepted the loss of work for an extended period because of the injury and the Coronavirus lockdown and accepted that we were all having to adjust and adapt.”

Rishi also went on to tell me how he spent his time in lockdown:

“I started thinking about using the opportunity to do something I had always wanted to do, so I began a series of Podcasts with a friend of mine who is an expert in the human condition and well-being. I loved being able to indulge in something that I felt would benefit me in the short and long-term. It also helped me to deal with the uncertainty of not knowing when I would be able to work again and general worry about the future. Well-being is an area that I would like to explore more in years to come. I, therefore, felt as though something positive had come from the time spent in lockdown so far. But it’s not over yet and I hope that as many of us realise that in order to be cautious enough to continue the fight against the virus.” 

You can listen to the Podcasts that Rishi created with Richard Moat – which are very very interesting – right here: https://audioboom.com/channels/5023526. Rishi has also donated a prize for my raffle for the Stroke Association, you will get to spend a day with Rishi at a race course behind the scenes whilst he works for either Racing TV or ITV Racing – to be discussed with the winner to arrange a date that suits all involved – I will have links at the bottom of this post if you’re interesting in entering to win!

I also spoke with Jay / TracksideJay on Twitter or as some of you may know him, the man behind the brilliant robotic commentary videos that kept us all going whilst we were in lockdown: https://twitter.com/TracksideJay/status/1273700697457020928?s=20 & https://twitter.com/TracksideJay/status/1273687701120847873?s=20 just to name a few! Jay is a content creator and tipster within the sport so the cancellation of racing affected him massively with his day job. I spoke to Jay about how the virus and cancellation has affected him and his business:

“Coronavirus has been hard on everybody, not only the racing industry and it’s still being affected now, even as guidelines start to lift. For me personally, the ban on racing has had a huge affect on my business as I’ve simply not had access to areas where I can actually carry out work.”

Jay went on to tell me what he had to do to survive the lockdown and gain an income.

“I’ve had to go back to working in a supermarket for the time being, to not only keep myself occupied, but also to help with cash flow, as being a fairly new business, I didn’t qualify for any government support.”

Jay also told me that he could do bits of his normal day job whilst at home.

“Luckily for me I have had the opportunity to carry out work for some of my clients from home, which has been a key part of me staying in business up until this point and I can’t thank them enough for it. A few weeks into the crisis it was quite daunting looking ahead as nobody knew when this would end. So for my clients to still rely on me and want me to do work for them was a huge morale boost to keep me going through the rough times, so I count myself lucky, it could have been way worse. The racing industry is notoriously hard to get involved in from a working perspective and I had spent every penny I had to try and do what I love, so for the Coronavirus to come along and almost take that away was quite a concerning time for me, but like I said, I’m not the only one in this boat and things could have been so much worse than what they are now.”

Of course, Coronavirus came and hit everybody all at once and pretty quickly. Jay was very honest about how he went about the whole virus towards the beginning and I for one, can relate massively with what he said:

“I think one of the mistakes I made was not taking the virus seriously enough at the start. I remember being in a pub in Malton after a few days of filming thinking ‘ah this will all blow over in a few days’ and that’s a massive learning curve for me going forward because I found myself playing catchup as I didn’t have a plan in place and found myself quickly in a role of a ‘keyworker’ wondering what had happened. Looking back on the choices I made to get through the pandemic, I feel very proud of myself that I did what I did, sometimes I tend to roll over and feel hard done by but this time I feel like I rose to the occasion and dealt with it in the right way, mainly because I still have a business there when at one point I really did think it was game over, which was a dark time for me.”

Jay went on to tell me just how the Coronavirus has affected him and his family personally. 

“My Grandad passed away during the pandemic and it went down as a COVID statistic, which wasn’t the reason for his death, but that was also tough on me as I really did think I was losing it all. But the racing industry and the people I work for (including Sainsbury’s) have supported me so much throughout this crisis and I honestly couldn’t thank them enough.”

And some final thoughts from Jay on the whole scenario:

“Things are not 100% back to normal just yet but I am confident that things will get back to how they were, not only for myself but for everyone else too. I have spoken to many people online and there’s so many out there going through a tough time, it’s important to talk about it and we will all get through it one way or the other and I’m always available for a chat if it’ll help you.”

In my personal opinion Jay is one of the best in the business and the content he creates is brilliant. I, for one, am so happy he has been able to bounce back and keep his business going, it would be a huge loss to the sport to lose his work.

I think it is so important to talk about how on course bookmakers have been affected by the virus. Whether you gamble or not, they are an integral part of the racing industry and even though racing has now resumed, it is of course behind closed doors, meaning there still isn’t a job there for on course bookmakers whilst no punters are there to bet.

I spoke with Kenny from Ostlers Racing who told me just how devastating the whole situation has been.

“The business has been decimated so we are now trying to get people to sign up to bet online via my website: https://www.ostlersracing.com/. Whilst racing has been cancelled I have had to focus on the website and also had to get myself a part time job.”

He went on to tell me how he feels about the way in which on course bookmakers have been treated.

“The race courses do not care at all for on course bookmakers and so I believe that we will be the last to return to the courses with heavy restrictions in place on the number of bookmakers who can attend. However racing behind closed doors can initially only be a good thing as we had to start somewhere.”

He also told me how he thinks some on course bookmakers may not make it through this pandemic.

“I believe that some bookmakers will fold and many others will lose money on their pitch investments that they have. The top bookmakers will prosper and the lower end bookmakers will struggle to recover.”

Again, as I previously mentioned, I think more bookmakers than what we potentially expect may not be able to return when they’re allowed to and that’s a real shame. They haven’t been looked after in any way, shape or form and that blame lies with the BHA. From what I have been told, they haven’t really been updated or informed of anything by the BHA and most of them are losing money daily with pitch fees that can’t be cancelled and obviously no work. Some of which cannot rely on the government for support for various different reasons and to me it’s a real shame that they haven’t been more supported by the BHA. It’s as if they have totally been forgotten in all of this. However if you wish to sign up and help Kenny and his business by betting online with them, you can do so here: https://www.ostlersracing.com/. To me, if the BHA can’t support them, then we need to. We need to stop betting with the big players that we know will survive this and start helping those lower down the chain who need the help the most.

So, that is part one complete. I want to thank Oisin, Rishi, Jay and Kenny for taking time out to speak with me. I hope you enjoyed the first part of this project.

Part two will be going up on Thursday at 6pm which includes Grace Mcentee, Charlie Poste & more. You can now also subscribe to my blog so you receive an email whenever I post. If you’d like to do that, scroll down on the side bar and you will see a Follow My Blog section. If you enter your email, every time I post you will receive an email so you don’t miss a thing!

Thank you for reading, I will see you all on Thursday with Part two of this project.

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Sidenote: My raffle to raise money for the Stroke Association is now LIVE. So you can pop over to my Twitter and view this tweet for all information: https://twitter.com/zoelouisesmithx/status/1277629857460113410?s=20 There are some fantastic prizes and it is for a fantastic cause in honour of the 10 year anniversary of my mom’s stroke. The Stroke Association help not only those directly affected by a stroke, but also their families. They helped my mom massively and I wanted to raise money for them so they can continue to help other people in need. I hope you can all join me in raising money for this incredible cause!

An Interview with Liam Keniry

Liam Keniry

Hiya guys!

Today I bring to you an interview with Liam Keniry. I hope you enjoy!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Liam: Favourite race, win or lose, would probably be the Cambridgeshire 2004 on a horse called Spanish Don who came along very early in my career, I was still an apprentice and won a couple stakes on him and obviously winning that Cambridgeshire at the time as an apprentice was very good. 

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Liam: Favourite horse I’ve never ridden would be Sea The Stars; what he did in his classic season was just brilliant. He had everything. Won the Guineas, the Derby and all them other races he did, it was probably just… yeah just amazing what he did that season.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Liam: The whip… I think the BHA have the whip rules absolutely spot on and if the whip was every banned it would be a backwards step for racing, I believe. 

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat everything and anything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Liam: As you get older it becomes easier to manage your weight. I would always have a little bit of breakfast no matter what weight I have that day. Something small to eat in the evenings and just plenty of exercise. Yeah, your weight is easier to manage when you’re quite busy doing  two meetings a day and stuff, so it’s not really an issue.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Liam: I think people who think racing is animal cruelty are probably people who have never been to a racing stables and haven’t seen how well these horses are looked after and cared for and how prepared they are when they go to racing. The majority of the time the horses are so prepared that they probably find it quite easy and I imagine most of them quite enjoy it.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Liam: Yeah, it’s good to be busy. I prefer it that way, the busier you are, the fitter you are and I think the easier it is to keep your eye on the ball. If the racing gives time off it can be quite nice to go on holiday with the wife for a couple of days just to get away for a couple days. But in general it’s better to be busy.

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Liam: I always looked up to Kieren Fallon when he was riding. He was just a genius in the saddle and he was Champion Jockey a many times. Especially in the big races, Fallon was as good as there was in his time riding I think.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Liam: Any Group 1 race would be great. Yeah, any Group 1 race would be brilliant.

Me: What is your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Liam: I am very close to riding 1000 winners now, I think about 30 away from that so hopefully if we get back racing soon, if I can do that by the end of this year it would be good and just to continue to ride winners every year after that, that would be good.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Liam: A horse looking forward to this season would probably be a horse called Indeed who is trained by Dominic Ffrench Davis. He did quite well last year and hopefully he should have a good year this year. We’d like to think he definitely up to winning in a listed class and hopefully there are a couple of big races in him yet.

Me: What is your favourite race course to ride at and why?

Liam: It would probably be Newbury. I am primarily based in Lambourn so Newbury would probably be my local track to there and I think it’s a big galloping track and quite fair, so yeah, it’s a good track Newbury, it’s a fair track and a good track and it’s always nice to ride a winner there. 

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Liam: I think… always follow your dreams. Work hard. Working hard will always help you in life no matter what job you do.

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Firstly I want to thank Liam for his time, he gave some brilliant answers. Hopefully he reaches 1000 winners this year, I will definitely be following his progress as he becomes closer to that goal!

Thank you for reading.

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An Interview with Tom Garner

Tom Garner

Hiya guys!

Today I am bringing you an interview with Tom Garner who is Oliver Sherwood’s stable jockey. I hope you enjoy!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Tom: There’s been a few that meant a lot but probably winning the two Grade 1’s I won last year in Saratoga on Winston C – A horse that I brought from England. It was the first Grade 1’s as a jockey and as a bloodstock agent.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Tom: Many Clouds. I rode him a lot at home and would have loved to have ridden him on the track, he’s the best horse I have ever sat on.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Tom: I think the public need to be educated more about the stick and how we use it. I agree with the current rules, but if a horse isn’t going to go for one smack, it’s not going to go for multiple. So young lads starting out should be better educated on how to make a horse go without having to resort to the stick.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat everything and anything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Tom: I’m lucky that my weight is okay at the moment, but I have been up to over 11 stone when I should be about 10 stone. I find alcohol is the worst for my weight and unfortunately for me, I love beer, but when it comes to eating I don’t watch it too much, just when I need to. I’ve lost over 7 pounds before in 24 hours, which isn’t advisable. But I just do plenty of exercise most days and I ride out and that keeps it level.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Tom: Again, the same as the stick. The public need to be better educated before they have opinions. If they saw the way the horses are cared for and the love of the horses from the stable staff who look after them day in, day out then a lot of people would change their minds.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Tom: It’s hard for me to get away as I ride in England during the winter and America during the summer, but when we have had a few days before, I’ve been skiing with a few other lads or try and get to Dubai to visit friends who are riding out there, otherwise the days I have off I usually go out hunting or shooting.

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Tom: Two people I have looked up to have recently retired. They are Noel Fehily and Leighton Aspell, both have helped me massively during my career.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Tom: Obviously the Grand National or the Gold Cup. But I have finished 2nd and 3rd in the Pardubice so coming that close has made me want to win it even more.

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Tom: I want to be Champion Jockey in America and come back and keep a good relationship with the trainers in England and win as many horses as I can, whilst I can.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Tom: England would be a horse of Ben Pauling’s called Your Darling and America would be Winston C. He has a lot more good days ahead of him.

Me: What is your favourite race course to ride at and why?

Tom: I love Sandown. I’ve had a lot of good days with Rayvin Black and I love riding over fences there.

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Tom: Someone said to me when I was starting out ‘work will overcome talent if talent doesn’t work hard’. Just to work as hard as you can and take advice from older lads in the weighing room. The most talented rider isn’t always the best jockey if he or she doesn’t work hard.

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As always, first things first, I want to thank Tom for taking the time to speak with me, I know he is super busy whilst riding in America currently so I appreciate making the time to answer a few questions. 

I thoroughly enjoyed this interview so I hope you guys did too. I will see you all next Saturday at 11am for An Interview with Liam Keniry.

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An Interview with Phillip Dennis

Phillip Dennis

Hiya guys!

Today I am bringing you an interview with Phillip Dennis, I hope you enjoy!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Phillip: My favourite race that I have won so far would have to be the Epsom Dash on Ornate. To win a big handicap just 40 minutes before the Derby was great and a real buzz, he also gave me my first Group One ride in the Nunthorpe this year, which would be up there for a favourite ride that didn’t win. Hopefully he can be seriously competitive in listed or group company this season.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Phillip: If I could have ridden any horse past or present, I’d have to say Frankel as an obvious one. He was just a freak of a race horse and his Guineas win and York win stand out for me. A less obvious one would be Sole Power, he looked a real character to ride.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Phillip: I think the whip issue could go on and on but it really is an important piece of equipment that the wider public don’t really understand. I’m not sure what the best way to go is, whether it’s tighten up penalties or reduce hits, but in my opinion, banning it would be crazy.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat everything and anything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Phillip: I’m fairly lucky with my weight that it stays quite level and I can eat relatively well, depending on what weights I have in the coming days. 48 hour declarations are definitely a help to get the weight sorted for a lighter ride. In the summer I’d watch it a bit more than in the winter. When it’s quieter you can use it as a bit of a break for the body.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Phillip: If I was to talk to someone who thought racing was cruel, I’d have to explain to them how well the horses are looked after, morning and night. People think they are forced to run, but the majority are only happy when they are out with a saddle on them. Stable staff do an unbelievable job and treat them like they are their own.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Phillip: During the odd days I get off I try to play golf… very averagely. But I’d be a fair weather player. So other than that I like to spend time with friends and family. During the lockdown I tried my hand at the odd bit of DIY and gardening.

Me: Who do you look up to in the dressing room?

Phillip: In the North, it’s a great bunch of jockeys, as people and riders, so it would be hard to single one person out that I look up to, but any advice I can get off the more senior riders is a massive help and I like to get as much as possible.

Me:What is one race you’d love to win?

Phillip: The obvious races I’d love to win would be the classics, like any jockey. But on a more personal level, I’d love to win the Nunthorpe, being my local track and I love sprinters. Another one would be the Ayr Gold Cup. My dad used to take me and my mate up every year to watch it with him, so that one would be up there. When I was young it was always the Grand National, but not sure I’d be brave enough now, unless it was an old school master.

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Phillip: In the coming season or two I’d like to keep building on numbers and also the quality of horses. Last year I got to 47 with a few nicer ones in there, so to keep riding in them sort of races would be great and to get above 50 would be nice.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Phillip: A horse to watch would be Que Amoro, a filly I won on for Michael Dods in the apprentice race at the Ebor Festival. She’s a seriously fast filly that stays the 5 furlongs strongly and on fast ground I think she’d be able to go up a level into a listed / group 3 company for them.

Me: What is your favourite race course to ride at and why?

Phillip: York would have to be my favourite track, it’s my local, has the best racing in the North and arguably, the country. Always has a great crowd and the atmosphere is unbelievable.

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Phillip: My advice to any young person would be hard work can always beat talent, so as long as you want something, don’t let anyone tell you you can’t or aren’t good enough. Just make sure you work as hard as you can and harder than anyone else and you’ll get to where you want to be.

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Firstly a massive thank you to Phillip for taking the time out to speak with me. From speaking to him I think he is someone who wants to learn and continuously improve in the sport and that is a great attitude to have and he will definitely be successful with that thought process. 

I hope you enjoyed and I will see you all next Saturday for An Interview with Tom Garner.

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An Interview with Danny Mcmenamin

Danny Mcmenamin

Hiya guys!

Today I am bringing to you an interview with conditional jockey Danny Mcmenamin, he is a jockey that is coming through the ranks and is definitely one to watch out for in the future. I hope you enjoy!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Danny: Winning the Greatwood Hurdle at Cheltenham is surely a day I will never forget. The amount of times I have dreamt of that in my head and for it to happen was the best day in my life. Cheltenham is a special place, festival or not it is the home of racing.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past of present, what horse would you choose?

Danny: Kauto Star, he’s a horse which I fell in love with when I was growing up. His ability was freak like, the whole racing community loved him. He was a proper horse.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Danny: My opinion on the whip is that it needs to stay for jockeys and other horses safety. There has been a massive improvement over the years with new rules and newly designed whips and I am sure things will improve further.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat everything and anything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Danny: To be honest I’m very lucky with my weight as I’m small, so I get to eat pretty much what I wish to eat. Obviously I just don’t eat junk food, all my meals are homemade and healthy, thanks to my girlfriend.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Danny: Everyone has their right to an opinion, but horses aren’t forced to race, they do it because they enjoy it. It’s in their nature to compete. The horses in racing get extremely looked after.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Danny: When I get some time to myself, which isn’t often, I like to play football and taking the dogs on a walk, which both are a good way to maintain fitness. I’m pretty much into anything outdoors.

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Danny: The person I look up to would be Brian Hughes. The way he rides is admirable, everything just looks smooth. He’s always in the right place at the right time in races. He has helped me a lot since I started out and I have a huge amount of respect for him.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Danny: The one race I would love to win would be the Grand National. It has always been a dream of mine. Toby Dobbin, who’s from the same town in Northern Ireland as me and is a family friend, won it, so it would be great to win it.

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming years?

Danny: My overall goal would be just to try and ride as many winners as I can and to keep improving and learning over the years.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Danny: My horse to watch over the next year or two would be Marown trained by my boss Nicky Richards. He is currently unbeaten in 3 starts, one in a bumper and two over hurdles. He’s a big, strong type, proper chasing type. In time he can only improve from what he has done now. Will be exciting to see what the future holds for him.

Me: What is your favourite race course to ride at and why?

Danny: My favourite course, I have to be honest, but one would be Carlisle because, one, it’s only 20 minutes away which helps, but also it takes getting used to, you have to be in the right place at the right time around there. You need a horse which can travel and if you go too soon, you’ll never get home, but if you leave it too late, it’s hard to make ground up that hill. Timing and jumping is everything around there.

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Danny: My advice to anyone who has a passion for something, whether it’s sport or other things, is to never stop chasing that passion, no matter if people put you down, people will always doubt you, but when you prove them wrong it will all be worth it. If you believe in it, you will achieve it, it’s just some hard work, dedication and self belief, that’s all that’s needed.

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Firstly I want to say a massive thank you to Danny for taking the time to talk to me. I think he is definitely someone to keep an eye on, he is very knowledgeable in the sport and always open to learn more, which is always a good thing. I, for one, can’t wait to watch his progress!

Thank you for reading. I will see you all next Saturday at 11am for An Interview with Phillip Dennis.

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An Interview with Amy Murphy

Amy Murphy

Hiya guys!

Today I am bringing to you an interview with the brilliant, quickly up and coming trainer Amy Murphy. I hope you enjoy!

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Me: What’s your favourite day of the racing calendar?

Amy: On the flat, my favourite day would be the Tuesday of Royal Ascot and National Hunt, it would be the Tuesday of the Cheltenham Festival.

Me: What’s the goal for you and the team? Grand National, Gold Cup, Champion Hurdle, what’s the dream?

Amy: My goal as a trainer would be to win the Cheltenham Gold Cup. For the team, more realistically, my goal would be to constantly hit and better the targets we set at the beginning of each season. In doing so, I would hope that we can then improve the quality of horses in training.

Me: If you could train one horse that is currently in training elsewhere, what horse would you choose and why?

Amy: Enable, for obvious reasons. She is everything that you would look for in a racehorse.

Me: Do you ever get any down time? What’s your favourite thing to do when you do get some spare time?

Amy: The best down time for me is having a relaxing day with my family and friends with a glass or two of champagne. 

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Amy: I would ask them to take the time to visit my yard and see first hand the five star care and attention the horses get and then tell me whether they still think the horses are suffering from cruelty.

Me: Kalashnikov is one of the most loved horses over the past few years, how is he? Where do you hope he goes next season?

Amy: This National Hunt season did not go to plan for Kalashnikov. However, he has had a period of rehab and will now have a long summer break out in the field with the other National Hunt horses. I would expect him to be back in the early part of the Autumn 2020/2021 season.

Me: What’s your favourite race course to visit?

Amy: My favourite flat track would be Chester and my favourite National Hunt track would be Fakenham for the friendly country feel you get.

Me: What is your ‘horse to watch’ that you train?

Amy: A horse to watch for the future would be Rudaina over middle distances on a flat galloping track.

Me: What’s your favourite race to look back on as an owner, rider or trainer?

Amy: My favourite race to look back on would be the Betfair Hurdle, again for obvious reasons.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding discussions of banning the whip?

Amy: With regards to the whip debate, I can see both sides of the argument. Personally, I feel the whip should not disappear as, if nothing else, it is an aid for correct measures in a race.

Me: What is your best piece of advice for a young person following their passion, whether that be in racing or something else?

Amy: My advice would be to follow your dreams and make sure you get plenty of hands on experience in order to make sure your dreams become a reality. Also, never be afraid to ask for other people’s opinions and advice.

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Firstly, as always, I want to say a massive thank you to Amy for taking the time out to speak to me. Personally I think Amy is a trainer to watch, she is a brilliant trainer, a lovely person and overall just a great female ambassador for our sport.

I really hope you all enjoyed this interview and I shall see you all next Saturday at 11am for An Interview with Danny Mcmenamin.

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An Interview with Max Kendrick

Max Kendrick

Hey guys!

Today’s post is an interview with conditional jockey Max Kendrick, he gave some really interesting answers so I really hope you enjoy!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Max: My favourite race would have to be on Graceful Legend at Ascot, it was my first Saturday winner as a conditional. It was very memorable to enter the winners enclosure where so many great horses and jockeys had been before. Another race that springs to mind is The Aintree Foxhunters in 2014, I had my first ride round the national fences on Court Red Handed. The adrenaline rush was unbelievable and it certainly wet my appetite to ride in the main event.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Max: I would have to choose the mighty Kauto Star. I grew up watching the Kauto – Denman battle, it fuelled my passion for racing. I always wanted Kauto to win as he was extremely versatile with speed and stamina on his side and was champion over 2, 2.5 & 3+ miles. I also wonder what it would be like to ride something like Frankel, I rode a few winners on the flat as an amateur on horses rated around 70 and I thought I was going fast so I can’t even begin to imagine the speed that something rated 130 must go!

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Max: I understand it is a very sensitive subject, I think for the good of the sport we have to be seen to continually evolve, improve and educate people about horse welfare and the sport as a whole. Changes have been made with regards to the whip, the national and everyday practices both on the racecourse and at yards. Personally, I think the whip rules are in a good, manageable place at the moment. It allows jockeys to ride a race and correct horses without any risk to the horse. It is heavily monitored by stewards and cameras every day across all meetings, big or small. I worry that if we bow to the people who want to ban the use of the whip completely they will not be satisfied until racing is no longer an industry or sport. I believe the key is education and the recent BHA videos featuring Tom Scudamore are a good start to empowering passionate racegoers, jockeys or trainers with information they can readily share with people who may not fully understand the whip. Perhaps changing the name from ‘whip’ to another name would also help remove some of the negative or aggressive connotations with the word. We are all part of this industry because we have a love and passion for horses and ultimately we all want what is best for the horse.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat everything and anything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Max: I am very lucky that weight isn’t an issue for me personally. I am passionate about health and fitness so I do remain on a balanced diet all year:

Breakfast: All Bran Cereal with skimmed milk, protein pancakes or Boiled Eggs.

Snack: Fruit e.g. Apple or Banana

Lunch: Whole wheat pasta with meat and vegetables

Snack: Fruit

Dinner: Meat and vegetables

I tend to let myself have one day a week of eating as I want, this helps me maintain this balance all year round. I don’t really drink unless it is during the jump racing break in August, aside from that I keep eating well all year round.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Max: I would ask them to look at both sides, to visit a yard and witness first-hand how well horses are treated on a daily basis and also to go to a racecourse and see the specialist vets, care and legislation in place to protect all parties involved, including the horses. The racing industry gives the thoroughbred horse a purpose, like dairy cows for example they are bred with a purpose in mind. Do you think farmers would keep dairy cows if there was no longer a need for milk production?

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Max: I love all sport and am a lifelong Arsenal supporter for my sins. I love watching them whenever I can and am lucky enough to visit the Emirates a couple of times a year, whenever racing permits! I also have a Labrador called Ned who is great to have as I get the same greeting from him whether I have won, lost or fallen – he never fails to cheer me up after a bad day. I have an amazing circle of friends outside of racing, it’s good to spend time with them and my girlfriend to have a break from it all!

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Max: People that have been very influential to me in the weighing room are; Kielan Woods and Paddy Brennan. They have ridden plenty of winners between them and are fantastic mentors, they have never hesitated to point something out if it needs improving. When I was younger, before I was in the weighing room watching Ruby Walsh and Sir AP McCoy battle it out was always a highlight for me.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Max: It has to be The Gold Cup for me on the biggest stage for jump racing at The Festival, that’s the dream. If you win the Gold Cup you can without doubt say that you have won on the best staying chaser that year. I, of course, grew up watching Kauto Star, Denman and Imperial Commander fight out some of the best Gold Cups in history.

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Max: I am down to my 3lb now so firstly, it is to ride out my claim. Looking past that, I would like to keep consolidating the relationships I have built over the years. I want to continually improve the quality of races I am winning.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Max: My horse to watch is a very nice store by Kayf Tara that my Mother owns called Ted Da Titan, he was supposed to run this spring but the Coronavirus has put pay to that, he has been going very well at home. He will now spend the summer out and will hopefully run well in a bumper in the Autumn.

Me: What is your favourite racecourse to ride at and why?

Max: I love riding at Exeter, I have had some luck round there and it is a very fair, big, galloping track. You don’t often find too many hard luck stories there.

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Max: Follow your passion, don’t be afraid to ask advice from people already in the industry but above all work hard and don’t give up on your dream. 

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Firstly, a massive thank you to Max for taking time out to answer some questions. He is an incredible jockey and he will definitely go onto big things, I can’t wait to follow his career and see where it takes him. He gave some in-depth answers which are always interesting to hear from people in the industry, so I really hope you enjoyed!

I will see you all next Saturday at 11am with An Interview with Amy Murphy!

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An Interview with Ben Curtis

Ben Curtis

Hey guys!

Today I am bringing you an interview with flat jockey Ben Curtis. I really hope you enjoy!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Ben: I think my favourite win so far was an early one. The Irish Lincoln on Drombeg Dawn at the Curragh. It was a race that helped kick start my career on a bigger scale.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Ben: A horse I was close to working for John Oxx at the time, Sea The Stars was a horse I would have loved to have ridden in a race. He oozed class in all aspects.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Ben: I believe as a sport we have bent over backwards to co-operate with all of the bad publicity this subject receives. There is no whips in racing as it is! We are using pillows on sticks. They do not cause any pain only persuade horses through sound. Either way they are always going to be needed for safety purposes and I believe that as long as we, as jockeys, stay within the rules and guidelines that are currently set, the current situation should not be looked at again to appease anyone and we now need to stand our ground on this matter.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat everything and anything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Ben: As a jockey I believe it’s hard for anyone to stick to a routine diet with the amount of travelling involved, logistically it is near impossible to plan. Personally I don’t eat breakfast and would often miss lunch. But I love an evening meal and I live by the philosophy once you burn more than you put in then you won’t put on weight. It’s very simple.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Ben: Anyone who considers horse racing as cruel are misinformed and uneducated on the matter. These horses receive five star treatment. They are bred to do a job and love what they do. And a visit to any racing stables will highlight the regard and love these horses receive.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Ben: It all depends on what you plan for the year. Whether it is to take some downtime in the winter, attack the all weather or focus on jobs abroad. Downtime for me is rare as I like to keep busy and competitive throughout the year. But when I do, I like to spend time with my family and love a day out with a few beers and music with friends and depending on the amount of beers a possible dance.

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Ben: Mick Kinane was always my idol, but presently looking up to Ryan Moore and Frankie (Dettori) two completely different characters but both masters of their trade.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Ben: I’m not pinpointing one but there are a few, the Nunthope as I love York, the Derby or any race at Royal Ascot. 

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Ben: My main goal first and foremost is riding winners but a group one is my ultimate and what I put all the work in with a view of achieving.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Ben: I think Lord Of The Lodge is a classy animal and when the ground is soft a horse called Ainsdale could turn into a high class sprinter.

Me: What is your favourite racecourse to ride at and why?

Ben: York and Ascot are both exceptional tracks to ride and both get large crowds and have an atmosphere to boot. 

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Ben: If you are lucky enough to pursue a job or career that you love, put in the hours, do the work and don’t give up. There are a lot of downs in any career choice but once the highs outweigh them you are on the right track. Always look at where your going, not where you’ve been!

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Firstly, I want to say a massive thank you to Ben for taking some time out to speak with me. He gave some brilliant answers and I really enjoyed this one, I hope you guys enjoyed it too!

I will see you all next Saturday at 11am for An Interview with Max Kendrick!

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An Interview with Cian MacRedmond

Cian MacRedmond

Hiya!

Today’s post is an interview with Cian MacRedmond who is an apprentice jockey to Declan Carroll. He gave me a brilliant interview with some in-depth answers, so I really hope you all enjoy.

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Cian: My favourite race that I have won was just a handicap at York on Music Seeker. To win it on such a big weekend on John Smith’s weekend it was brilliant. The place was packed and I would absolutely love to have that feeling to come into a packed parade ring again.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Cian: Sea the stars is a horse I would love to have ridden. He was absolutely amazing and to see what he achieved in his three-year-old career it’s just outstanding.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Cian: Like other fellow jockeys I do think that the that the discussion around banning the whip is outrageous. I do think that people are not completely educated surrounding the whip and its uses. No matter how hard you hit a horse with the whips it does not hurt them. They are completely padded and it’s only the noise of the whip that makes the horses go forward. It also helps with horses that hang and every jockey out there can tell you if they did not have a whip when a horse hung with them they would’ve been in serious trouble and could of got themselves, the horse or someone else hurt. I do believe that the whip rules should remain as they are.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, so what would you eat on a regular day? Are there any periods across the year where you can actually just eat anything and everything or is it a strict kind of diet all year round?

Cian: Like most jockeys I do struggle with my weight. Being 5 foot 10 and trying to constantly keep my weight around 8 stone 6 lb is very hard. I do eat a lot of fruit and drink a lot of tea, coffee and water and try and keep my weight stable. During the winter when there is not much racing it’s very hard, I could be anywhere between eight stone six and nine stone purely because I’m not as active as I would be throughout the season. During the season when I’m very busy and I could be riding out horses in the morning, for racing because I am so active I tend to eat whatever I want so I am very lucky in that regard. I try my best to stay out of the sauna because when I come out of that my weight seems to go up and down like a yo-yo.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Cian: To anyone that thinks racing is cruel I do think they should go into a yard in the morning and they can see how horses are treated. There are treated like royalty.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Cian: Racing is all year round but I don’t tend to ride during the winter purely to try and save my claim being an apprentice. I’m still busy breaking in yearlings but when I’m off work I usually play golf or go back home to Ireland to visit my family and friends. I also find myself binge watching a series on Netflix too.

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Cian: I do look up to many of the lads in the weighing room but one person that stands out to me is Danny Tudhope. He’s very hard working and also struggles with his weight. He’s an outstanding rider and he’s a great role model for any young jockey out there.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Cian: One race Id love to win is the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe. It’s definitely my favourite race to watch and people from all over the world watch it. The best horses all around the world run in it and would be a childhood dream if I was ever to have a ride in it.

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Cian: I don’t really set myself goals because I know things don’t always go your way but hopefully in the next few years I’ll just keep improving and start to ride in better races on better horses.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Cian: My horse to follow for the next season is a horse I won on twice last year called Music Seeker. He seems to always be improving and at the moment he’s in the form of his life. He has given myself and the Bryan family some great days and I’m sure there’s a nice valuable handicap in him next season if he gets his ground.

Me: What is your favourite racecourse to ride at and why?

Cian: My favourite racecourses is the Curragh. I grew up two minutes down the road from it and I rode my first winner there on a horse called Sweetest Taboo. It’s a very fair track and the best horse in the race usually wins there.

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Cian: The best advice I can give anyone is keep your eyes open, your ears open, and your mouth shut. If you live by that you’ll get to where you want to get to in life.

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Once again, as always, first things first I want to thank Cian for his time. Cian is a brilliant lad and has a bright future ahead of him. I can’t wait to follow his journey!

I hope you enjoyed!

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