Is Ryan Moore one of the Greatest Flat Jockeys of our Time?

Hi guys!

Today’s post is something a little different to my usual horse racing posts, however I thought it would be an interesting one. On social media Ryan Moore is a highly debated person within racing, some people love him, some people hate him – a little bit like Marmite. So I thought today we would just stay neutral and go through some of the facts and figures of Ryan’s career. I found it very interesting looking through different articles and figures and I though why not share with my audience. So today we will simply look at Ryan Moore as a whole, his life, career and more importantly his stats!

Disclaimer: The facts, figures and stats are all from different sources online and I have simply compiled them altogether into one post, I have tried to use multiple sources to ensure all facts are as accurate as possible. I apologise if anything is incorrect. Please feel free to tweet me anything that may be incorrect so I can change it. At the time of writing this post 27/09/20 all of the figures are accurate according to my online sources used. So with that being said… Let’s jump right into it.

Ryan Lee Moore was born on the 18th of September 1983, making him currently 37 years old. Ryan was born into a horse racing family, his grandad Charlie Moore was a well known trainer, his dad is ex jockey and now trainer Gary Moore, he has two jump jockey brothers Jamie and Joshua and his sister Hayley Moore was a top amateur now TV pundit, so overall I would say Ryan being involved in the sport was just meant to be.

Ryan Moore starting riding horses at just 4 years old, he had lessons at his Grandad’s yard and with a pony club. And when he was 12 years old he led National Hunt jockey AP McCoy over hurdles as they schooled some of Ryan’s fathers horses. Ryan later said he was inspired by his drive and dedication stating:

He wanted to ride everything in the yard. His work ethic was huge.

Ryan didn’t always know he wanted to be a jockey, as he very much enjoyed his football and he did in fact have trials for Brighton and Hove Albion as a youngster. However, being a jockey was the direction Ryan went in and he has not looked back since.

Ryan Moore had his first winner at just 16 years old on a horse called Mersey Beat on the 15th May 2000 at Towcester over hurdles for his dad Gary Moore. At this point his mom actually tried to convince Ryan to stay in school and focus on his A-Levels however after just one month of doing his A-Levels he decided to leave and focus on his riding. Ryan also rode a couple of winners for his grandad before he passed away in 2000.

In 2003 Ryan became the British Flat Racing Champion Apprentice before winning his first group race in 2004 on the 29th of August when he won the Group 3 Prestige Stakes at Goodwood, followed by a Group 2 in the September in the Mill Reef Stakes on Galleota for Richard Hannon.

In 2006 Ryan then rode his first Group 1 winner in the Juddmonte International at York on Notnowcato for Sir Michael Stoute, this was the year he then first became the British Flat Racing Champion Jockey.

The following year, in 2007, Ryan rode Notnowcato to victory in the Tattersalls Gold Cup in Ireland and then in the Eclipse. During 2007 Ryan rode more winners for Sir Michael Stoute (47 out of his 126) over his then mentor Richard Hannon (33 out of his 126). However Ryan spent 3 months injured so he never retained his jockey championship, instead finishing 3rd. At the end of 2007 Ryan was then offered the position of stable jockey for Sir Michael Stoute.

In 2008 Ryan retained the jockey’s championship and kept it in 2009 also. Over the course of 2009 and 2010 Ryan travelled the world riding in the big races. He won the Breeders Cup, then he won the Derby on Workforce – in a record time – and the Oaks on consecutive days. He then won the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe on Workforce. He later broke his wrist costing him the chance of another jockey championship. However most involved with the sport were already calling him an ‘all-time great’ including former jockey Willie Carson who said he could be as good as Lester Piggott.

In 2011 Ryan’s vision changed. Instead of wanting to retain his jockey championship he wanted to concentrate on fewer bigger races instead so he could focus on his family. At this time he started riding for many celebrity owners including Michael Owen, Paul Scholes, Ashley Cold and Sir Alex Ferguson. He also rode Carlton House to victory in the Dante Stakes at York and 3rd in the Epsom Derby for the Queen. He then finished 2011 by winning on Snow Fairy in a Japanese Grade 1.

It was around November 2011 when rumours starting circulating that Ryan Moore was being lined up to join Aidan O’Brien as his stable jockey. However Ryan didn’t want to move his family from England to Ireland so it was instead agreed that Ryan would stay in England and ride for Aidan O’Brien in Ireland at major meetings. Following this decision, in 2012 Ryan won the 1,000 Guineas on Homecoming Queen and the 2013 Derby on Ruler Of The World for Aidan O’Brien.

In 2015, Joseph O’Brien who was the Ballydoyle number 1 jockey ahead of Ryan was struggling to make the weight to ride in major races, so therefore in the April it was confirmed that Ryan would now ride all the number one horses in Classics and any other major races. By the end of 2017 Ryan had won over 2000 races in Britain.

Now lets talk statistics, races and records.

Firstly, Ryan’s major wins in the 20 years he has been riding. He has won the 2,000 Guineas twice (2015 & 2017), the 1,000 Guineas four times (2012, 2015, 2016 & 2020), the Epsom Derby twice (2010 & 2013), the Epsom Oaks three times (2010, 2016 & 2020), the St Leger Stakes twice (2017 & 2018), the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes twice (2009 & 2016), the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe twice (2010 & 2016), the Japan Cup once (2013), the Melbourne Cup once (2014) and the Breeders Cup Turf four times (2008, 2009, 2013 & 2015).

At the point of me writing this (27th of September) Ryan has had 2701 winners, including 136 Groups 1’s, 118 Group 2’s, 165 Group 3’s and 170 listed races. He has also placed in 4042 races, including 229 Group 1’s, 173 Group 2’s, 233 Group 3’s and 248 listed races. These are out of 15553 starts, 890 Group 1’s, 643 Group 2’s, 849 Group 3’s and 896 listed races.

So let’s put all of those figures into perspective. Essentially Ryan has won 15.28% of the 890 Group One races he’s started in and he has placed in 25.73% of those 890 starts. Overall meaning he has at least placed or won 41.01% of the 890 Group One races he has started in. So looking at his figures as a whole, Ryan has won 17.37% of the 15553 starts he has had in his career, he has placed in 25.99% of those 15553 starts meaning overall, in the whole of his career he has won or placed in 43.36% of the 15553 starts he has had.

I have searched high and low for an accurate figure of how much Ryan Moore has won in prize money from the beginning of his career until now and the most highly shared is that of $282,026,720 which with today’s exchange rate is the equivalent to £221,284,228.09 over a 20 year period.

Another interesting thing I have found is the winners Ryan has had per trainer he has rode for. Ryan Moore has rode in 2637 races and won 572 of those and placed in 773 for Sir Michael Stoute. Of which 21 were Group One’s, 37 Groups Two’s, 60 Group Three’s and 45 Listed Races. Winning $40,825,902 / £32,032,880.47 in prize money.

In second place is Richard Hannon, where Ryan has rode in 2202 races for Richard Hannon where has won 306 and placed in 528. Of which, only one was a Group One, 7 Group Two’s, 8 Group Three’s and 16 Listed Races. In total he has won $8,472,916 / £6,648,032.06 in prize money for Richard Hannon.

Then comes in Aidan O’Brien in third place, where Ryan has rode in 1186 races and won 271 and placed in 343. However interestingly, maybe, probably predictably, Ryan has won the most amount of money for Aidan totalling $97,425,309 / £76,441,992.09 with a total of 83 Group One wins for Aidan O’Brien, 44 Group Two wins, 53 Group Three wins and 39 Listed Races.

Another interesting set of stats is the Group One races Ryan has won around the world. So number one on the list is Great Britain where he has won 58 Group One’s, Ireland is next with 21, followed closely by France with 18. Next up is USA with 13, Japan with 8, Hong Kong with 6, Canada with 4, UAE with 3, Australia (Victoria) also with 3, Germany and Italy both with 1 and then the three places he has rode in but hasn’t won a Group One is Australia (New South Wales) where he has placed once in seven Group One’s, Singapore where he has placed once in two Group One’s and South Africa where he placed in the one Group One he has had there.

Something I found interesting and wanted to just add in was the horses Ryan has had the most wins on. First up on the list is Galeota who Ryan rode 18 times, won 8 times and placed twice. Secondly is Mostarsil who Ryan rode 21 times, won 8 times and placed twice. Third is Order Of St George who Ryan rode 12 times, won 7 times and placed 3 times.

Following on from that I do want to look at his wins as a percentage. First in that order is Crystal Ocean who Ryan rode 7 times and won 6 times (85.71%) and placed once. Next is Minding who Ryan rode 9 times and won 7 times (77.78%) and placed twice. And third is Envision who Ryan Rode 9 times and won 6 times (66.67%) and placed one.

I have tried to keep this post as neutral as I possibly can using statistics alone to show who Ryan Moore is and how his facts and figures line up. However now I will give a little bit of my opinion and I would love to hear yours over on social media! I think the stats don’t lie, Ryan Moore is a brilliant jockey. I think over the years his priorities have changed – as they would with anyone – due to his children growing up and him wanting to focus on them, however his work ethic is still one of the top in the game. He rides winners for fun and has done for many years and I know many people say “it’s because of the horses he rides” but you can say that about anyone. It isn’t Ryan’s fault that he is given a leg up on some of the best horses around. Apart from the fact Ryan loses whenever I bet on him or put him in my pick 7, I can’t fault him. He is a brilliant jockey, who sometimes gets into a bad position that he can’t get out of – which jockey doesn’t though? Ryan may not be a people person and we all know that from when he’s been interviewed over the years, but there is no doubt about it he is very much a horse person and I love watching him.

Today’s post was a little different for me but I thoroughly enjoyed doing the research into this and I really hope my audience enjoy it. I have a few posts lined up over the next few weeks including more of my Horse Racing History series as well as more posts similar to this where we break down the facts and figures for different jockey’s, flat and National Hunt as well as a stable visit to one of the best National Hunt trainers in the country and a point to point yard where horses are broken in for some of the biggest trainers around so we can have an in depth look at how that is done, which I am super excited for. You can now subscribe to my page to ensure you receive an email every time I post, to do this simple press the ‘Follow zoelouisesmithx.com’ button on the right hand sidebar to this post.

See you all very soon in my next post!

An Interview with Jamie Spencer

Jamie Spencer

Hey guys!

Today I am bringing you an interview with Jamie Spencer who has achieved brilliant things within the sport. I hope you enjoy this little insight to him!

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Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Jamie: Riding a winner at Cheltenham on Pizarro, lots of other more important flat races but jump racing I was born into as my father won the Champion Hurdle.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never have, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Jamie: Boring selection, but obviously Frankel. He’s been the best horse of my lifetime.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Jamie: If it’s not broken, then don’t fix it. Horses are herd animals and generally run together as a pack to see who’s the best, then they need a form of encouragement.

Me: You have won multiple classics in your career as well as being Champion Jockey both in Ireland and Britain, what do you class as your biggest achievement? What are you most proud of this far in your career?

Jamie: Winning the St Leger on Brian Boru in 2003, it was a month after one of my best friends and housemate Kieran Kelly had died from a fall at Kilbeggan.

Me: As a jockey, weight is obviously a huge thing for you guys, is this ever a worry for you?

Jamie: My weight isn’t a major issue so I’m fortunate.

Me: You rode for Aidan O’Brien for a short while as his stable jockey at Ballydoyle, since then he has gone on to break all sorts of records, as have you. How was it working for him?

Jamie: He’s clearly broken all the records, been a genius in the sport. We are all older and wiser now and thankfully he’s supported me to win many Grade 1’s since then.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Jamie: We all start in racing because we love the horses, that sentiment never leaves, from a personal point of view.

Me: Racing is an all year round sport, so when you do get some down time, what do you like to do?

Jamie: It’s an all year round sport, but as I have gotten older I do more for myself so I take plenty of time off. I can’t complain.

Me: Who do you look up to in the weighing room?

Jamie: I admire lots of people for varying reasons. For example, Luke Morris is a tremendous advocate of how there is no substitute for hard work. Then you get Andrea Atzeni who’s naturally a gifted horseman. And then there’s plenty who do very well but if I was an owner I wouldn’t use them, so who’s right and who’s wrong? Racing is all about opinions.

Me: What is one race you’d love to win?

Jamie: The Derby.

Me: What’s your overall goal in racing over the upcoming few years?

Jamie: I’m on the back nine regards being a jockey, I’ve concentrated on other areas of the sport for many years and hopefully will utilise these efforts in the future. The beauty of racing is nothing is a given.

Me: What would be your ‘horse to watch’ for the next season or two?

Jamie: I’m particularly hopeful Mohican Heights can progress, but like everything at this time of year, it’s a guessing game.

Me: What is your favourite race course to ride at and why?

Jamie: Ascot. It’s been good to me and I love going there more than any other track.

Me: What is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Jamie: If you want to be involved in racing, there are no short cuts. I believe the jockeys adapt so well as they’re not educated enough to realise it’s madness the hours they put in and living the dream of finding the good horse. Outside of racing, well I know nothing else than this game, but I’m guessing if you follow people like Bill Gates or John Magnier’s advice, you won’t go far wrong.

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As always, firstly I want to thank Jamie for taking the time to speak with me, he is a ridiculously talented jockey who has achieved some incredible things so it was an honour to get the chance to ask him some questions.

I hope you enjoyed!

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An Interview with Donnacha O’Brien

Donnacha (1)

Heya guys!

Today’s post is another ridiculously exciting one, an interview with Donnacha O’Brien. Donnacha has only recently retired from the saddle at 21 years old as the Irish Champion Jockey and now he has followed in his father and brother’s footsteps and taken up training. I was lucky enough to grab a few precious moments during Donnach’s very busy morning to interview him, I really hope you enjoy!

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Me: You obviously won some incredible races as a young jockey, what is the big goal now as a trainer? What is one race that you would love to win?

Donnacha: The Epsom Derby is the pinnacle of flat racing, so long term that would be a goal. I don’t want to set any short term goals really as I’m still just figuring things out.

Me: You were riding, arguably, the best you ever had when you decided to retire from the saddle, how hard of a decision was that? What pushed you to finally decide now was the time?

Donnacha: It wasn’t an easy decision to make, but there was never going to be a good time to make that call. I am happy with the decision I made and I am looking forward to next season as a trainer.

Me: What are your opinions surrounding the discussions of banning the whip?

Donnacha: The whip is a very well designed device that helps get the most out of the horses without hurting them. I know myself from getting hit by other riders in the heat of a finish that it doesn’t hurt. I understand the argument that it’s the perception of it that hurts racing, but I feel we should be concentrating on education people about it, instead of banning it.

Me: Is it difficult to come from such a massive racing family, with the pressure of constantly being compared to your dad or your brother?

Donnacha: Not really. I’m used to it as this stage. I think the advantages outweigh the disadvantages.

Me: What is your favourite race of your career, win or lose?

Donnacha: I got a real buzz out of Kew Gardens at Ascot. I always thought he could beat Stradivarius and to do it the way he did was very exciting.

Me: What would you say to anyone who thinks racing is animal cruelty?

Stop reading things from people that don’t know what they are talking about. Go to a yard during an open day and meet the horses and people that look after them in person and then decide for yourself.

Me: If you could ride any horse that you never did, past or present, what horse would you choose?

Donnacha: It would have to be Frankel. He was the best I’ve seen and possibly the best ever.

Me: You bowed out at the top as the Irish Champion Jockey for two consecutive seasons – Do you have any regrets in your riding career? Or any races you wish you could have won?

Donnacha: Of course there’s plenty I didn’t achieve, but you can’t achieve everything. I was very lucky in my career and I don’t have any regrets.

Me: Your dad and brother are obviously incredible trainers – How much advice have you taken from them? What’s the best advice you have been given?

Donnacha: I have learned everything I know from my family. Dad always says “you can only do your best, so if things don’t go right you have to accept it and move on.”

Me: What is one of your horses that you think we should look out for this season?

Donnacha: Fancy Blue is probably the highest profile horse I have. She is two from two and will hopefully contest some classic trials next year.

Me: What is your favourite day of the racing calendar?

Donnacha: Royal Ascot is a very exciting week for everyone in flat racing. That along with both the Irish and English Derby days.

Me: You’re only 21 and already achieved some incredible things, what is your best advice for young people who have a passion they want to follow, whether that be racing or something else?

Donnacha: Try and always be pleasant to people. It’s never an advantage to make someone dislike you regardless of whether you agree with them or not. After that, all you can do is your best.

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I want to firstly say a massive thank you to Donnacha for taking some time out to answer some questions, he truly is a gentleman. Donnacha has some very exciting prospects in his yard and I am sure he will be adding to his yard more and more as he progresses. I really hope you enjoyed this interview and I will see you all in my next post!

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